Zulu JRE from Azul Systems is a hidden gem

http://www.azulsystems.com/products/zulu Azul Systems, the company that Cliff Click works for, builds their own openjdk version.

If you don’t recall Cliff Click, I was first introduced to him via this awesome video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agH7Cz5FSxY

If I have to run on the JVM, then this is how I want to run on the JVM.

Zulu isn’t Zing, and yet it is a hidden gem. No more stupid prompts from Oracle. No more being associated with the company that forces you to install the Ask toolbar and other spywear.

The download page is here: http://www.azulsystems.com/products/zulu/downloads

It is the best (only?) way to get openjdk onto your OSX mac.

Better still is the package install on Ubuntu.

sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv-keys 0x219BD9C9
sudo apt-add-repository "deb http://repos.azulsystems.com/ubuntu stable main"
sudo apt-get update 
sudo apt-get install zulu-8

Zulu includes something called the CCK which says

The Commercial Compatibility Kit (CCK) for Zulu contains additional functionality that is not included in in the OpenJDK source, but which will help ensure compatibility in applications that take advantage of specific additional features that Oracle bundles into HotSpot.

curl -O http://cdn.azulsystems.com/zcck/2014-08-8-bin/zcck8-8.0.0.2-amd64.deb
sudo dpkg -i zcck8-8.0.0.2-amd64.deb

Do better Java on Ubuntu.

golang goals

When discussing the Go programming language, I find it useful to always reference the goals of the language. Discussion tends to devolve into a comparison of features of other programming languages which Go lacks. Without the context of these goals, the discussion ceases being useful.

Stolen from a Google tech talk that Rob Pike did back in 2009:

Goals

  • The efficiency of a statically-typed compiled language with the ease of programming of a dynamic language.
  • Safety: type-safe and memory-safe.
  • Good support for concurrency and communication.
  • Efficient, latency-free garbage collection.
  • High-speed compilation.

Watch the Go at Google video or read the article and you will get the impression that these goals are NOT in their order of importance. I suggest that the last item, High-speed compilation, trumps all the others.

Here is a short, 1:15 video demonstrating the speed of the go compiler: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwoWei-GAPo

The first comment, over 2 years ago, at Lambda the Ultimate, about that Go at Google video, sums it up even better. It is a snapshot of another slide. This time instead of Go goals, the slide is “What makes large-scale development hard with C++ or Java (at least):”

  • slow builds
  • uncontrolled dependencies
  • each programmer using a different subset of the language
  • poor program understanding (documentation, etc.)
  • duplication of effort
  • cost of updates
  • version skew
  • difficulty of automation (auto rewriters etc.): tooling
  • cross-language builds

* Language features don’t usually address these.

 

It took me quite a while to keep these above things in mind when thinking about Go. In fact, I still tend to compare Go to my favorite programming languages, probably because I often forget some of those above drawbacks to C++/Java (read C# for me).

I’ll try to remember. I beg others to try to remember too.

Testing Out Apache All By Yourself

By all by yourself, I mean, without root.

This is on my Mac running OSX 10.10.

  1. Get yourself an httpd.conf – cp /private/etc/apache2/httpd.conf .
  2. Edit it to use a port >1024 and with user you – Listen 8081 & User jrwren & Group staff
  3. Log to a place you can write – ErrorLog /home/jrwren/errorlog & CustomLog /home/jrwren/access_log combined
  4. Use different pidfile –  PidFile /home/jrwren/httpd.pid Do this fter the Include /private/etc/apache2/extra/httpd-mpm.conf
  5. Accept mutex –  Mutex file:/home/jrwren
  6. Edit whatever else you want – ProxyPass / http://localhost:8080 & SetOutputFilter DEFLATE to see that Apache proxy does gzip for you
  7. Start httpd – httpd -d . -f httpd.conf -X

Faster mongodb deploys with Juju

I made a change to the official mongodb charm.

Before the change, the install step, when deploying the charm took 5 minutes.

2014-11-17 20:54:13 Installing mongodb
2014-11-17 21:04:12 Entering config_changed

After the change, the install step, when deploying took a tiny bit over 2 minutes.

2014-11-19 19:14:55 Installing mongodb
2014-11-19 19:16:06 Entering config_changed

Before: Fetched 46.2 MB
After: Fetched 14.6 MB

Why the huge change? The charm was previously running ‘apt-get install mongodb’ which Recommends the mongodb-dev package which Depends on development packages, ultimately pulling in a c++ compiler and boost dev libraries and header files.

I am happy to download 1/4 of what I previously was required to download for the same functionality.

When writing charms for juju, or automating your deploys using any other tool, remember consider what the system is really doing with the commands you give it.

I highly recommend always running apt-get install with the –no-install-recommends option when you are in a server environment. You’ll waste less time.

A note on the time comparison: At first I hesitated to write this, because the hardware on which I tested this is doing other things. I then realized that this is exactly what all hardware in the cloud is doing all the time. This isn’t a benchmark. This isn’t a timing test. This is an example of making a single case of something slow, a bit faster.

 

Netatalk Ubuntu Trusty Package

https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/netatalk

This is a 3 year old piece of software in the latest Ubuntu LTS release. That is real bummer.

I don’t want to do all this:
http://netatalk.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/Install_Netatalk_3.1.6_on_Ubuntu_14.04_Trusty

I’d really just like to apt-get install netatalk and have the latest.

Using a 3.0+ version of Netatalk is especially nice since it uses filesystem extended attributes for AppleDouble instead of hidden files all over the place. http://netatalk.sourceforge.net/3.0/ReleaseNotes-3.0.html

First, the results:
$ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:evarlast/netatalk
$ sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install netatalk

A brief warning: config file syntax changed entirely from 2.2 netatalk to 3.0 netatalk. If you are upgrading from 2.x to 3.x you will need to audit your config files and test and make sure everything works.

How I did it:
On a refresh trusty install:
$ sudo apt-get install dpkg-dev devscripts libmysqlclient-dev libssl-dev systemtap-sdt-dev libdbus-glib-1-dev libglib2.0-dev tracker libtracker-sparql-0.16-dev libtracker-miner-0.16-dev libtdb-dev libevent-dev
$ sudo apt-get source netatalk
$ sudo apt-get build-dep netatalk
$ curl -o netatalk_3.1.6.orig.tar.bz2 -L ‘http://sourceforge.net/projects/netatalk/files/latest/download?source=files’
$ tar jxvf netatalk_3.1.6.orig.tar.bz2
$ cd netatalk-3.1.6
$ cp -a ../netatalk-2.2.2/debian .
$ dch -v 3.1.6 -D trusty
$ vim debian/patches/series # remove everything except the macusers patch
$ vim debian/control # edit and update with dependent packages we installed as listed http://netatalk.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/Install_Netatalk_3.1.6_on_Ubuntu_14.04_Trusty Be sure to add a final NETA_LDCONFIG=/bin/true to the configure flags
$ vim debian/rules # edit and update configure options as listed on wiki page
$ vim debian/atalk.docs # remove README line
$ debuild
$ dpkg-buildpackage -rfakeroot -S

Install the package or dput it into a PPA.

In putting this together I ran into an issue with a strange automake assumption that the build will be as root, or that the user running make can run ldconfig. This is not the case when building debian pacakges. Searching for NETA_LDCONFIG returned this url: http://oichinote.com/plus/2014/07/installing-debianized-netatalk-3-1-3-on-ubuntu-14-04.html

ctags for golang and vim; just the right things with godeps

I use vim.

I like to press ctrl-] to go to a tag and ctrl-t to pop up that tag stack.

I use ctags from homebrew to generate my tags file which vim reads. The OSX version of ctags is inadequate.

I often invoke ctags with -R . and a list of directory names to the libraries which I am using. When using ctags with python or C this works reasonably well, but I have to maintain the list of directories somewhere.

Go lets me handle this case slightly better.

godeps is a tool which does two things, in this case I only care about the first. godeps prints the source dependencies of named packages.

Combining godeps output and sending it to ctags means my tags file automatically has tokens from all of my dependent packages. I name this shell function goctags.

goctags () { godeps ./… | awk -v GOPATH=$GOPATH ‘{print GOPATH”/src/”$1}’ | xargs ctags -R .; }

I added it to my .bashrc.

Elasticsearch on Ubuntu

It sucks, but it doesn’t have to.

1. Import the GPG KEY from the elasticsearch repo.

 curl -s http://packages.elasticsearch.org/GPG-KEY-elasticsearch | sudo apt-key add -

2. Add the repo.

echo “deb http://packages.elasticsearch.org/GPG-KEY-elasticsearch stable main” |sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/packages_elasticsearch_org_elasticsearch_1_3_debian.list

3. Update your apt cache.

sudo apt-get update

4. Install the elastic search package.

sudo apt-get install elasticsearch

If this is a server, then configure ES to run on system start and start ES now:

sudo update-rc.d elasticsearch defaults 95 10
sudo service elasticsearch

If this is a development environment, then the following may help.

Homebrew on MacOSX allows for ability to simply run “elasticsearch –config=myconfig.yml” and have different elasticsearch instances. I want this on my Linux dev system.

1. Copy elasticsearch shell script to a place in the path. $HOME/bin works just as good as /usr/local/bin here, if it is in your path. Then you can skip the sudo on these commands.

sudo cp /usr/share/elasticsearch/bin/elasticsearch /usr/local/bin/

2. Copy the in.sh file there too.

sudo cp /usr/share/elasticsearch/bin/elasticsearch.in.sh /usr/local/bin/

3. Set the ES_HOME in the in.sh file.

sudo sed -i ‘2 a ES_HOME=/usr/share/elasticsearch’ /usr/local/bin/elasticsearch.in.sh

4. DFSG don’t work if the app isn’t built correctly, so symlink the config back in place. Config won’t get used, but logging.yml will.

sudo ln -s /etc/elasticsearch/ /usr/share/elasticsearch/config

That shall do it. You can now test run a few different instances.

for $dir in a b ; do
mkdir $dir
pushd $dir
cat > config.yml <<EOM
cluster.name: cluster_$dir
path.data: ./data
path.logs: ./log/
network.host: 127.0.0.1
http.port: 1234
EOM
elasticsearch –config=config.yml &
popd
done

Now you have a slightly less terrible elasticsearch on your Linux system, about on par with what you get from homebrew on a Mac.

Setup a New Mac

A couple years later, and I find myself referring to my own guide

But in a different order of important things.

0. Caps Lock key is a Control key, Preferences->Keyboard, fix that, while I’m there, remove some of the -F keys from being bound, I’m going to need apps to see them.
1. I NEED THE SSH KEY, and copying a private key can be kind of a challenge, cuz… privacy.
2. Finder needs to see hidden files. http://lifehacker.com/188892/show-hidden-files-in-finder says – defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles TRUE ; killall Finder
3. AppStore has a nice purchases view, so I can easily find apps I have on the old/other Mac – click yes to Evernote.
4. Get iTerm2 – http://www.iterm2.com/#/section/home and DO NOT CLICK the big DOWNLOAD button… click the download tab/section at the top and get the Test Releases download, start it, and under profiles->default-> select the keys tab & click the Left option as +Esc selection
5. Copy .bashrc and .bash_profile
6. Copy Music/iTunes folder, maybe?
7. Manually inspect https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/homebrew/go/install before actually going there and doing the http://brew.sh installation via ruby -switches $()… because… SECURITY!… also, I like to sudo mkdir /usr/local ; sudo chown $USER /usr/local ; so that home-brew install doesn’t run anything as root.
8.  System Preferences -> Keyboard -> Shortcuts -> All Controls (at the bottom) – so that I can tab to selections in dialog boxes
9.  MacVIM – because I like it
10.  vim things like python-mode, vim-fugitive
11.  firefox aurora and login with my firefox password
12.  brew install go
13.  add GOROOT to .bashrc and GOROOT/misc/vim to vim rtp
14.  … I don’t really know what else.

UGH, how could I forget: download Envy Code R and tell vim to use it: http://damieng.com/blog/2008/05/26/envy-code-r-preview-7-coding-font-released  Add set guifont=Envy\ Code\ R:h13 to .vimrc

Follow the rest of the old post http://jrwren.wrenfam.com/blog/2012/03/07/setting-up-a-new-mac/

Leaving a Great Job for a Great Job

Today was my last day as an employee at Arbor Networks.

Leaving  Arbor Networks was a tough decision. There are so many good people and interesting problems at Arbor. When I was approached by folks, I said, “I’m not done working on stuff at Arbor.”

The work, people, culture and environment really are that fun at Arbor. As a result, the last weeks and days of my working at Arbor have been super busy as we came together as a team and decided to get some stuff done. We set some goals and achieved them before I left.

On Monday, I start at Canonical working on Juju. I am super excited to work with a team of people who are behind making the best cloud orchestration tool, and contribute to making it even better.

I’ll be learning more about Go in my new roll. Expect me to write a bit about learning go. I learned a ton about Python at Arbor Networks. I didn’t write about it because I feel like everything I learned is very well documented. Go is a much younger language. Hopefully I can contribute to its documentation and share my learning experience in a meaningful way.

babblings of a computer loving fool